A Kid’s Eye Test

A kid’s eye test is considered a necessary part of the preparation for going to school. Most experts agree that, if there is a significant vision problem, this will adversely affect their learning.

However, a kid’s eye test becomes even more important if your child is struggling at school in their learning, especially reading, writing or spelling. I want to reveal to you the types of things that are done in a kid’s eye test, and why not all eye tests are the same…

What’s in a Kid’s Eye Test, and Why Should I see You?

There are many aspects to eye examinations, so not all eye tests target the same things.  It stands to reason that eye tests for children target the aspects of vision that are important for a child, especially when it comes to their learning.  So a standard adult eye test, as good as it is for detecting eye disease and the need for corrective spectacle lenses, does not necessarily apply when it comes to children.

It all starts with being able to relate to the child. Kids tend to be frightened or apprehensive when it comes to a kid eye examination, so relating to them is an essential part of testing.  Given the fact that many people, including my wife, think I have never really grown up, this enables me to relate to and communicate with children.  It also helps to set their fears aside and to establish rapport with them.

I do not know what most Optometrists do differently when they see a child, but I can reveal what I do and the tests that I perform on a child, especially a child with learning problems, ADHD, ASD or dyslexia.  Here’s what I test for…

1. Clear distance (Visual Acuity)

short sightedness in childrenEvery Optometrist should test for a child’s seeing ability.  A child should be able to see distant objects clearly and sharply. This clarity is called visual acuity and is usually measured using the familiar Snellen eye chart which has letters of steadily decreasing size. Children who cannot read yet are usually tested using shapes, so here at Eye CU, we can test children of almost any age, or children with any disability.  Problems with eye teaming can cause things like a lazy eye, which will also affect visual acuity, so an kid eye exam is important even before school commences.

2. Change in Focus (Accommodation)

A kid’s eye test must include testing of their focus ability.  Kids focus differently to adults, and many times their ability to focus fatigues during the school day.  The child must be able to do two things efficiently with their focus:  They have to be able to change quickly and effectively from near to distance and back again (such as when they are copying off the board), and they also have to be able to sustain their focus on a near object like a book for a long period of time without tiring (such as when they are doing homework).  We test both of these in children routinely, and a kid’s eye test mus include this type of testing.

The most common symptoms of a focus or an accommodation vision problem include inconsistent distance or near blur, sore eyes, headaches, losing of place copying off the board and, most common of all, POOR CONCENTRATION FOR READING!

3. Aiming the Eyes (Eye Teaming)

Another important Kid’s eye Test deals with Eye coordination, which is the ability to team two eyes together, having them fixate (look at) the same point in space with comfort and without double vision.

If the eyes do not point precisely at the same object this can cause headaches, poor concentration, tiredness, confusion or, in severe cases, double vision. This is sometimes called convergence insufficiency, and if present it greatly affects children when they read, causing them to lose their place, misread words or skip lines.

4. Eye Movements (Saccades and Tracking)

kids readingEye movement control is another essential part of a paediatric eye exam, and it is essential for reading and ball sports, yet most Optometrists never perform this Kid’s Vision Test!

There are two main types of eye movements we look at in an eye exam for children, and both require the eyes to work together as a team. The first type is the quick and accurate movements which are used, for example, when the eyes move from one word to another while reading. These are jumping movements which are called ‘saccades’.

The second type of eye movements are known as ‘tracking’ and these should be smooth and accurate. Tracking movements are used when the eyes follow a moving object such as a ball in flight or vehicles in traffic.

Children who lose their place a lot while reading, mix up words, misread words, skip lines and often have difficulty watching the ball while playing sport. These kids may have poorly developed eye movement skills, and they can be easily helped by the right type of vision therapy.

5. Depth perception

Depth perception is another aspect of a kid’s eye test which is often overlooked.  It involves the ability to determine relative distance, recognised by many as the 3D we see in TVs and at the movies. Accurate depth perception is also needed to hit a ball while playing sports, or to park a car accurately (not that many kids are doing that!). Depth perception is easily tested in a kid eye exam at Eye CU, and my experience is that many children compromise this important skill in an effort to concentrate when they face problems with their focus or eye teaming.

6. Eye-hand Coordination

Another critical part of a Children’s Vision Test is eye-hand coordination, which involves the eyes directing and controlling the hands.  It is especially important in writing, and also in many sports, especially small ball sports like cricket and tennis.  In younger children it plays an important role in the formation of letters and words on a page, and difficulties with eye-hand coordination are often picked up in Prep or Kindy kids when they struggle to colour in the lines.

7. Visual Memory

child seeingThe skill of visual memory is essential in reading, and especially in spelling.  Poor visual memory skills almost always result in poor spelling, but Darin’s special vision therapy program can help children to learn spelling words quicker and more effectively by training visual memory.

And let’s face it, if a child cannot visualise and remember sight words, how can they read effectively?  This is an area I love to work with, because the results are so tangible yet easy to achieve!

8. Peripheral Vision  

Peripheral or side vision is the ability to see and interpret what is happening to the sides of our vision while looking straight ahead. It is especially important for adults when driving a car and is also is key to playing a lot of sports.

However, you may not realise that it is also an important part of reading and writing for a child, helping them to maintain their place more easily and allowing them to flow as they read.  Try reading through a toilet roll so you can only see a word at a time and you will experience some of what children with learning problems go through.  That’s why a kid’s eye test is so important,. and should go beyond just the ability to see clearly on a page.

9. Spatial Awareness

Spatial awareness is another key developmental skill, and if this is not correctly developed, kids start to write letters and words backward. While many parents are terrified of this symptom thinking it equates absolutely with dyslexia, we have had tremendous success training spatial awareness for stopping kids reversing.

 

A Kid’s Vision Test is Special

I believe that a kid’s vision test should be a special experience.  Relating to children and drawing out the correct answers can give insight into their struggles with learning, and while vision is not the only consideration when it comes to learning problems, it is certainly one of the main areas parents should look at.

One of the huge advantages that the visual system offers us in learning is that it is so easily and safely treated. We can use things like reading glasses and vision therapy which safe, easy to administer and very cheap compared to many of the other areas considered in treating children who struggle in school.

So if your child is struggling to learn to read, write and spell effectively, then a kid’s eye test is a great place to start!

 

Is your child dyslexic? There is a lot of talk these days about dyslexia, probably more than ever before.  An evolution of the definition appears to have taken place, and this has caused confusion for many parents.

The Classic Dyslexic

The classic dyslexic as described in the original literature by people like Drs Adolph Kussmaul and Rudolf Berlin (who first used the word dyslexia to describe someone who, in his terms was “word blind”) implied that the condition was genetic, and thereby incurable.  Examples of such patients were not common, and they displayed an inability to recognise words, as well as the classic symptom of writing words in reverse.

The Modern Dyslexic

The problem is that, as the definition has morphed into pretty much any reading or writing difficulty, the assumption that the condition is incurable has not morphed in the same way.  Dyslexia is now an extremely common diagnosis in some fields, and the problem is that many teachers, and parents, feel that it is a problem that nothing and no one will be able to help in any way.

Several innovations have attempted to help the child dyslexic, the most famous being coloured lenses (Irlen lenses). Less well known is the kind of treatments we offer in our practice, where we use conventional, clear lenses and innovative vision therapy to help dyslexic kids.

How Can We Help?

I’ll e honest, I’m not a fan of labels, especially when they are applied to a child who has enough problems learning!  I see their usefulness at times, but I would rather prescribe a solution than a label any day.

Vision is the dominant sense in the classroom, and so it makes sense to examine it closely.  Almost every child with a learning problem can see the print, so clearly we are going to have to go beyond the current medical model of so-called 20/20 vision.

Just because a child can see the print, does not mean they can learn effectively!  Chimpanzees can see the print, but they cannot read, so again we are going to have to do better than a traditional eye examination.

Behavioural optometry looks at far more than a child’s ability to see, and we perform many complex tests looking at the child’s eye teaming and focussing, and their ability to decode and process words on a page.

Using specialised lenses, we find we can often dramatically improve a child’s focusing and concentration when it comes to reading and writing. But hey, concentration is only part of the solution, as any parent knows.

Vision Therapy to the Rescue

I have designed my own vision therapy course which trains the basic visual skills kids need when they learn. Glasses might help, but of the child is far behind we need to try something to catch them up fast.

Using our exclusive vision therapy course, many have seen not instant but sustained improvement in their children, whether they are dyslexic or carrying another label.

Why not have a look at our vision therapy here…

click

Or better still, call this number and make a time to come in for your BULK BILLED eye examination…

5457 3333

If you find your child getting more tired at school or after school and they may have a problem with their vision that can be easily solved.

The level of pressure that is on our kids school varies depending on the time of year, and as the year rolls on and we head into the final terms we find that many children begin to struggle to maintain the concentration, or start the push themselves more thereby causing an increasing tiredness and other symptoms like headaches and sore eyes.

If you notice your child getting more tired at school or after-school, and if you recognise that his is increasing as the year rolls on, then you need to examine the situation closely.

Here are a few things for you to consider…

1. A Child Getting More Tired at School is Not Normal

The first thing to realise is that your child getting more tired at school or seeming to be excessively tired after school is not normal.
Many people put their child’s excessive tiredness down to factors like not sleeping well, or doing too many out-of-school activities. While this may be true, excessive tiredness among schoolchildren especially at school or after school is almost always a result of their having to concentrate more and more, thereby stressing the visual system.

So if you find your child getting more tired at school as the year progresses, don’t just put it down to extracurricular activities.

Have your child’s eyes tested and make sure that they are not suffering from eye strain, made worse by the increase pressure of their school year.

2. Is Your Child Getting more Tired at School or on Weekends?

A definite warning sign is when your child is getting more tired at school than they do on weekends. If weekends are busy but your child seems to handle things, but they get excessively tired during the week, then this is almost always a sign that they are failing to cope with the pressure of school and that usually means eyestrain.

3. Does Excessive Tiredness Affect Schoolwork?

There is no doubt that has your child is getting more tired at school the overall performance decreases. This is true also of the adults, because our level of concentration and our ability to think clearly and apply ourselves is reduced the time to we get.

If your child is struggling at school, and especially if you find your child getting more tired at school, dealing with eyestrain problems could easily cause a significant improvement in their school performance and the concentration span.

4. If My Child is Getting More Tired at School is there any Danger?

If you find your child is getting more tired at school than they were before, there is a very clear and present danger that they will start to go short sighted. Shortsightedness in our school population is set to increase by 200% in a 10 year period, primarily due to the amount of close work kids are now doing based around technology.

When a child starts to use large amounts of technology like iPads, tablets and phones, and when they start to spend long periods of time on computers, studying or even watching movies on their laptop, the pressure on the visual system increases dramatically.

If your child is a high achieving child, they’re not going to put up with getting more tired at school for long. most often, they will try to find a way round this problem, and one of the most common ways now is for your child to go myopic or short sighted.

In shortsightedness development, kids lock their focus on the near objects they are concentrating on for long periods of time, and when their focus fails to relax back in the distance the distance becomes blurry. If this becomes permanent, which it often does, they have found a solution to getting more tired at school, but at the expense of the distance vision.

Short sighted children frequently finish in full-time glasses for the rest of their lives, so the stakes are high.

What Can I Do About my Child Getting More Tired at School?

One of the most important things you can do to help your child if you notice they are getting more tired at school is to get their eyes tested. As a behavioural optometrist, I see excessively tired children frequently and in most cases and able to offer a quick and effective solution using glasses, eye exercises or both.

Of course, any way you can take the pressure off your child will help as well. Having them do less schoolwork, spending less time with technology or doing less after-school activities should decrease the tiredness. However, many times they are resistant to making these changes, and you will do well to examine when it is that they are seeming to be excessively tired.

The big warning bell is when they are getting more tired at school or immediately after school. If they are coming home with a headache or sore eyes, or they seem dreamy or bleary when you pick them up from school, then this is most often an eye problem which can be quickly and easily dealt with.

Sing a behavioural optometrist’s and getting a behavioural vision test can indicate whether focus, eye teaming or something else is affecting their vision. In my practice, I sit and discuss the issues with parents and children, and also revealed the sorts of adverse effects that can come about as a result of the child getting more tired at school.

To avoid problems like shortsightedness, to increase their concentration and improve their performance at school, the right eye test is frequently the answer.

So don’t let your child continue to struggle when the answer could be right in front of your eyes! If you find your child getting more tired at school than ever before, get a behavioural eye test and help them to reach their full potential without excessive tiredness.

Language based learning disability is one of the terms attributed to dyslexia. While the definition of dyslexia is changing constantly, it is estimated that up to 10% of the Australian population has this condition.

Possible Symptoms of a language based learning disability or dyslexia

A language based learning disability can present with a number of signs and symptoms, including slow, painful reading and decoding errors especially involving the order of letters.

Other symptoms include reduce comprehension, trouble with spelling, handwriting or recalling of words, and misreading words or lines.

Reduced concentration is also another symptom of a language based learning disability, will reduce concentration is not specific to that condition.

What many people do not realise is that most of the symptoms are also the symptoms of visual dysfunction. Because vision is the dominant sense in the classroom, with over 80% of all information coming through the eye gate, it stands to reason that vision can form a significant part of the problem.

Help for a language based learning disability

If your child is diagnosed with dyslexia or a language based learning disability, you need to explore all avenues to help them. Failure to help them will see them slip behind their peers year after year, and before you know it they will hate learning and school!

One of the easiest things to do for a child who is struggling from a learning disability is to get their eyes tested. A comprehensive eye test at a behavioural optometrist may uncover an diagnosed vision problems.

If this is the case, as is frequently seen in many school-age children, a simple reading or enhanced reading lends can go a long way towards improving concentration.

Lack of visual skills can be helped further by the right kind of vision therapy, such as our learning at lightspeed program. This program has a great track record for improving children who have a language based learning disability.

Other Strategies

There are also other strategies that you can use to help children who are struggling in their learning…

Provide a quiet area for activities like reading, and used books with larger print or bigger spaces between lines.

Provide books on CD or MP3, or provide lecturer notes.

Allow the use of a laptop or tablet in class.

Use multisensory teaching methods.

Teach children to use their logic rather than memorising a specific pathway

Present teaching material in small units rather than in large chunks.

While the strategies may be helpful in helping children cope with their problem, the first and most important step is getting a comprehensive eye tests from behavioural optometrist.

If your child is struggling with these problems, I would recommend glasses, vision therapy, behaviour changes, tutoring or anything else that will help them. Studies show that the earlier intervention occurs, the more effective long term is.

So the message is clear…

If you are concerned that your child might have dyslexia or language based learning disability, visit your behavioural optometrist and get in touch with experts in your area who work with learning difficulties as soon as possible!

The relationship between a behavioural optometrist and dyslexia is an interesting one, and at times a somewhat controversial one too!

Anything to do with dyslexia is one of the most controversial areas of health care and development. None of the experts can agree with each other on what constitutes dyslexia, and the best form of treatment.

However, the behavioural optometrist and dyslexia should have a very close relationship. This is  because in many instances a behavioural optometrist can provide a solution not just for dyslexia itself  It also addresses the many and multifaceted symptoms that are dyslexic child might produce.

So what does a behavioural optometrist do, and how can this possibly relate to the most common of learning problems in our society. Is there any common ground between the behavioural optometrist and dyslexia, and can we offer any solutions?

The Behavioural Optometrist and Dyslexia Treatment

Dyslexia treatment behavioural optometrist have a lot in common. Behavioural optometrist specialise in treating not only the eyes of children, but also the way in which they use their eyes to take information in. The vast majority of learning problems including dyslexia are visually based.  This is because over 80% of all information in the classroom is taken in through the eyes.

So what does a behavioural optometrist do that is different?

All optometrist will examine the eyes of children, but most optometrists, particularly those associated with the big chains, treat children like miniature adults. They do a good job of testing their eyes as far as deciding whether they are long or short sighted. They also can examine the eye health, but they do not go any further than this.

The behavioural optometrist performs all of the duties of a regular optometrist. They also looks at a number of aspects of visual perception and development. They look at how the eyes work together as a team, how they focus together, how much flexibility and stress the visual system is under while they are reading and a whole host of other tests.

They even look at how the brain visualises words for spelling.  Also how children process visual space (which relates to letter and number reversals) and how they actually move their eyes and control their eyes when reading.

What the Behavioural Optometrist Can Do for Dyslexia

It should be pointed out that in most cases the behavioural optometrist and dyslexia treatment does not involve use of coloured lenses, but rather uses spectacle lenses with optical powers to produce the same effect.

While dyslexia and behavioural problems are often reported by clinical psychologists, behavioural optometrist can actually have an effect on dyslexia and behaviour issues by reducing the stress the child is under when reading and studying. This in turn can reduce their frustration and improve their behaviour without undergoing any other treatments. In fact, I have given the appropriate reading lenses to many children and seen a decrease in frustration and an improvement in behaviour patterns within one month.

The frustration felt by the parents of a dyslexic child is often exacerbated by the fact that when they tried to obtain help for their child. Often all they get is a series of diagnoses rather than an actual form of treatment. For the behavioural optometrist and dyslexia children, there is a clear and easy to follow the path towards this treatment, with the appropriate lenses and vision therapy being available almost immediately.

Lenses and Vision Therapy

While lenses can cause a child to concentrate more effectively and for much longer and decrease frustration, they will not solve all of the problems associated with dyslexia. For example, you cannot put glasses on a child and expect them to spell better, or to start writing letters forward rather than in reverse. Any claims along those lines would certainly be bogus!

However, the behavioural optometrist combines lenses to relax the muscles in the eyes and cause the child concentrate more effectively with the appropriate vision therapy.  This vision therapy can train the visual skills that are lacking in the child’s development.  This can help dyslexia and its associated problems can often do this in a matter of months rather than years. The great news is that this does not involve drugs, medication or years of behavioural modification.

It also doesn’t involve coloured lenses that are socially unacceptable! Behavioural optometrist offers a treatment that is socially acceptable, targeted at the specific skills needed for learning and out of the way usually within 6 to 9 months.

This makes a trip to the behavioural optometrist an absolute must for every dyslexic, diagnosed or suspected. In my area, I even bulk bill most patients, meaning that most young dyslexia patients can be seen at no charge to the parents.

This is why after 30 years of practice, I believe that the relationship between behavioural optometrist and dyslexia is a strong one.  It can offer real and long-lasting improvement for children with learning disorders. This should provide peace of mind for parents, and something positive they can do to help their child rather than just getting another diagnosis and another label!

So while there are no specific dyslexia optometrist, the behavioural optometrist and dyslexia have always and continue to have a close relationship.

Learning difficulties are faced by many children, and these are generally built up over time.

When they are young, the start of learning difficulties could be a result that is in the middle or just under the middle of the class.

However, any difficulties a child has when they’re young will generally increase over time, becoming a bigger learning problem after Grade 3.

How Do Learning Problems Start?

If you have received a substandard school report about your child, then you may be wondering if your child is struggling to learn. Even if they are averaging the class, this doesn’t mean that their learning is operating to its potential.

Any measure of learning difficulties is going to depend on the statistical norm, but learning problems will vary from child to child. A very bright child who is only average in the school performance is underperforming, and over time could face more difficulties in learning.

Most parents have the ability to understand the potential that their child has, and of us often in a better position than teachers who are assessing children in relation to other children in the class.

From the perspective of a behavioural optometrist, learning requires a number of aspects involving visual system.

Firstly, the child must be able to concentrate properly. If they have trouble teaming their eyes together or sustaining their focus then concentration is going to be an issue.

Most often this particular aspect of vision is dealt with adequately using reading lenses or our enhanced reading lenses.

The second aspect of learning difficulties is far more difficult to deal with…

Visual Skills and Learning Difficulties

When we learn, all of us develop the skills necessary to do the tasks. These skills are not strictly I skills, but they do involve the I interacting with the brain.

Skills like eye movements, focus and eye teaming control, visualisation for spelling, left right awareness for reversals, coding, sequencing and hand eye coordination are some of the skills that are required to read, write and spell effectively.

Clearly using reading glasses is not going to help any of these skills. The only way we can enhance the skills is vision therapy, and my vision therapy specifically targeted to develop the visual skills that we need to learn.

Having developed my therapy over a number of years, and in several cultures, I have found it effective in developing the visual skills necessary for learning in almost every case.

As a behavioural optometrist, I use both lenses and vision therapy to improve children with learning difficulties, and we have outstanding success in this area.

Is there any magic? Not really, this is pure science applied not only in the form of glasses but also in the form of our vision therapy.

Using the therapy we can develop skills in much the same way that a child goes to football practice will become a better football. We can enhance skills because we practice them, and in my therapy is mostly the form of games stop so in the same way that should be a better guitarist if you go to guitar practice, or a better dancer if you go to dance lessons, so if you do vision therapy you will overcome learning difficulties.

If your child is struggling at school, then click this link because we have a free webinar that will enable you to examine vision therapy we offer a full you commit to it.

 

Watch the Free Webinar Here

The bottom line is, it is better to do something than to sit around and do nothing but watching your child get further and further behind in school.

Using the right techniques, the right lenses and the right vision therapy, your child is not need to struggle with learning difficulties but can begin to make steps to overcoming them are reaching their full potential student.

Many parents ask, “Where can I get my child’s eyes tested?”, and this is particularly important question.

While you can get your child’s eyes tested all over the Sunshine Coast, you will not get testing that is specifically designed for children. In fact, most optical stores on the Sunshine Coast treat children like miniature adults.

However, behavioural optometrists like myself at Eye CU Optometrists believe that children need to be closely examined in a special and unique way.

 

What to Look for When I Get My Child’s Eyes Tested?

 

You can walk of the street anywhere and get should child’s eyes tested, but this does not mean that it is the best testing available.

A behavioural optometrist has usually spent many years examining the eyes of kids, and the bulk of the patients they see are in fact children.

This means that they can devote extra time and have bought extra and specialised equipment specifically designed to examine your child’s eyes, especially when it comes to questions of learning difficulties.

The average eye test will look at the seeing ability of your eyes, whether your eyes a longsighted, short sighted or astigmatic, and that will look at the health of your eyes.

In most cases, this is nowhere near enough to establish whether your child is eyes are affecting their school performance.

A behavioural optometrist such as myself goes far beyond the normal eye test, with a battery of tests for you child’s eyes including specialised focus and eye teaming tests, 3-D vision, colour vision and reading tests, just to name a few.

 

After You Get Your Child’s Eyes Tested, What Then?

 

The question you need to ask yourself as a parent after, “Where can I get my child’s eyes tested,” is, “What type of solutions can you offer?”

Most optometrists have a range of spectacle lenses that they can use to help your child see more effectively, if that is the problem.

However, behavioural optometrists use specialised lenses to support your child’s focus and eye teaming when they are reading, which can often improve their concentration and their learning ability.

Most optometrists, including many so-called behavioural optometrists, limit their treatment to a pair of glasses. However, if your child has learning difficulties or dyslexia, a pair of glasses will not satisfy all of their needs.

Reading glasses or progressive lenses for reading a fantastic for improving a child’s concentration. For some children this is enough, but for many children with learning problems they may be concentrating better, but they are not performing better all learning more effectively.

That’s where having extra modes of treatment like vision therapy becomes a powerful weapon in the fight against dyslexia.

There is no magic involved in vision therapy, but behavioural optometrists realise that if we train the eyes to work more effectively, move more effectively and team together more effectively, then we can begin to have huge impacts on a child’s learning.

But we don’t stop there I have designed vision therapy that can not only help with the teaming and workings of the eyes, but can affect the way the brain takes in and interpret information through the eyes.

So with the right training and vision therapy, we can help hand eye coordination for writing, left right awareness to stop kids writing backwards, and we can train visualisation to vastly improve spelling ability.

So if you find your child falling behind at school, or if you are concerned with their learning ability, then it’s not just about getting an eye test, it’s about getting the right eye test.

So if your child has learning disabilities or dyslexia, and if you are asking, “Where can I get my child’s eyes tested,” the answer must involve a complete and comprehensive assessment by a behavioural optometrist.

kids get excessively tiredWhen your kids are starting at school, there is always going to be a degree of tiredness at the end of the day, but what do you do when kids get excessively tired?

Towards the end of a term I tend to get a large number of children in grades prep through three who seem excessively tired at the end of the day of school. I notice that these crop up particularly towards the end of the term, because they have been keeping up the pace from long time.

Frequently I have parents tell me that they think their child is tired because they not drinking enough water, and while that may be so in some cases, my experience is that the most frequent cause of tiredness in young children at school is related to bed eyes and vision.

Poor Focus Can Make Kids Get Excessively Tired

One of the most frequent causes of tiredness in children at school has to do with a focusing system. What many parents do not realise is that you can have a child who was neither long or short sighted, and that seized 20/20 or 6/6 vision, which is considered to be good vision.

In fact many parents have taken their child to an optometrist and been told exactly that… Your child is not longsighted and they have good vision, therefore there eyes are fine.

I see many frustrated parents who are asking the question, “Why is my child so tired at the end of the day?” They have had an eye test and think they have covered all the bases, but most often eye focus and eye teaming have been overlooked.

As a behavioural optometrist, I spend extra time looking at the way the two eyes focus together and how they team together, because these are important in a child’s learning. I run extra tests specifically to examine these areas, and most often these are the culprits when it comes to the times when kids get excessively tired.

If your child is returning from school very tired, if they’re failing to concentrate on their home work, struggling at school or even putting themselves to bed early, then the probability that your child has a vision problem goes beyond mere seeing is very high.

The bottom line is, if you want your child to perform at their maximum potential in school, they need to not be getting excessively tired, especially in the first three or four grades of school.

So if the kids get excessively tired after a day of school, the best thing to do is to get their eyes tested with someone who knows and relates well to children, and who has studied the effects of stressed out focus and eye teaming systems.

You also need to look for a practitioner who not only relates to your child, but can sit and talk to you about what your child is facing, and how it relates to their school performance.

Above all, do not overlook the effect that excessive tiredness can have on your child’s learning and school performance.

The treatment for this type of condition can be a simple as a set of reading glasses or as complex as a programme of vision therapy, but both of these could see your child concentrating better and being less fatigued towards the end of a day at school.

When kids get excessively tired after a day at school, especially when this is increasing towards the end of the term, the best thing to do is to get their eyes properly tested and make sure that there is no focus or eye teaming problem to be dealt with.

Poor Focus and Eye Teaming Can Make Kids Excessively Tried, but we can help!

 

Online vision therapyOnline vision therapy is a very effective means of establishing the visual skills a child requires in order to learn effectively. Unlike traditional eye workouts, which is attempting to strengthen muscles, online vision therapy is created to develop and train and visual abilities.

What is Online Vision Therapy and How Does It Work?

Training is a principle that the majority of individuals comprehend …

If we desire a youngster to be great at anything in life, we do not hesitate to train them. For instance, if they desire to learn to play the piano we will certainly send them to piano practice. If they wish to play football, we will send them to football practice. When they go to these practices, they are not in fact performing in front of an audience or playing a game at the highest level, but what they are doing is drilling the skills that they require to carry out on the huge phase.

However, when it pertains to checking out, we simply throw them on the field and hope they develop the skills they require!

Exactly what vision skills and  abilities am I talking about?

We are not born having the ability to read or do things required to read effectively. We can not regulate our eye movements so that they can move from one word to the next with confidence and accuracy, we can not team our focus and convergence so words are clear and single when we read. We do not understand the best ways to visualize to assist with spelling and word recognition. We cannot link  our eyes and our hands to assist in writing.

These are all abilities that we are not born with, yet we need them to perform properly in school.  In fact, we start developing them before we even get to school and continue this development as we grow through the early grades of education.
Some youngsters, particularly those with learning disabilities or dyslexia, are way behind in their visual abilities.

We can force them to do reading and writing, which they hate, and hopefully, gradually, they will gain at least some of the skills required to do the task. However, a much more direct and efficient method of enhancing them is to train the actual skills they use directly, and we can do this using online vision therapy.

Making use of vision therapy, Darin Browne is training the abilities kids need to perform well in school, and the terrific thing is that he makes use of a series of targeted games and activities that are fun for kids!  Using these specialized games and therapy techniques, he find that kids really want to strive to do the activities, and we see a comparable boost in visual abilities.

So if your child is having problems with reading, writing or spelling, don’t keep throwing them on the field expecting that, if they do even more of exactly what they hate, in some way, amazingly, it will all turn around and they will obtain the abilities had to carry out well. Didn’t Einstein say that the definition of insanity os doing the same thing over and over again, expecting different results?

Instead of making them do more of what they dislike, look into online vision therapy, take matters into your own home and begin training your youngster’s visual skills yourself, and give them the abilities they require to perform well in reading, writing and spelling.

The Nightmare of Dyslexia

DyslexiaMany parents struggle with children who have been diagnosed as having dyslexia, and this can open a world of hurt and heartache. Once your child is diagnosed, it seems like you face a continuous uphill battle trying to get help for them that actually works. If you are like most parents, you not interested in the label, you are interested in helping your child improve in the of reading, writing and spelling.

Years ago the term dyslexia was reserved for people who were actually “word blind”, and it represented a minimal brain dysfunction that no one knew much about. However, these days the term dyslexia seems to refer to any child who is struggling to learn, especially those who reverse letters or numbers.

Most of these children struggling with dyslexia do not have brain dysfunction at all, but have developmental dysfunctions which can be helped. As a behavioural optometrist, I have spent the last 30 years helping these types of children, using lenses and vision therapy as tools to help them concentrate and focus longer, and to improve their actual school performance.

Dyslexia is Not about Glasses!

Many people are trying to find the right set of glasses that will cure dyslexia in the kids. The fact is, dyslexia is a developmental disorder and classes will not cure it, though they may help your child concentrate for longer and perform better.

I often use support lenses, which are special glasses designed to help children concentrate and focus on their schoolwork longer. This improves their concentration, and can lead to improvement in performance, but it does not necessarily cause an improvement in their learning.

The Missing Link in Dyslexia

I believe that most dyslexics experience developmental delays in the skills that they need to perform well in the classroom. These skills include eye movements, focus, eye teaming, left-right awareness, visualisation, hand eye coordination and a number of other skills.

While I cannot offer dyslexic children a quick fix, or a magic pair of glasses, coloured or otherwise, what I can offer them is the chance to do vision therapy and trained the visual skills that they need to achieve in school.

This therapy can be done at home and is extremely cost efficient. I do not have a single child doing this therapy that is not improving, either lot or a little.

So if your child has been diagnosed with dyslexia, don’t put up with the nightmare any longer than you have to! A behavioural optometrist could be the answer to your prayers and most often the solution to the nightmare of dyslexia.