Language based learning disability is one of the terms attributed to dyslexia. While the definition of dyslexia is changing constantly, it is estimated that up to 10% of the Australian population has this condition.

Possible Symptoms of a language based learning disability or dyslexia

A language based learning disability can present with a number of signs and symptoms, including slow, painful reading and decoding errors especially involving the order of letters.

Other symptoms include reduce comprehension, trouble with spelling, handwriting or recalling of words, and misreading words or lines.

Reduced concentration is also another symptom of a language based learning disability, will reduce concentration is not specific to that condition.

What many people do not realise is that most of the symptoms are also the symptoms of visual dysfunction. Because vision is the dominant sense in the classroom, with over 80% of all information coming through the eye gate, it stands to reason that vision can form a significant part of the problem.

Help for a language based learning disability

If your child is diagnosed with dyslexia or a language based learning disability, you need to explore all avenues to help them. Failure to help them will see them slip behind their peers year after year, and before you know it they will hate learning and school!

One of the easiest things to do for a child who is struggling from a learning disability is to get their eyes tested. A comprehensive eye test at a behavioural optometrist may uncover an diagnosed vision problems.

If this is the case, as is frequently seen in many school-age children, a simple reading or enhanced reading lends can go a long way towards improving concentration.

Lack of visual skills can be helped further by the right kind of vision therapy, such as our learning at lightspeed program. This program has a great track record for improving children who have a language based learning disability.

Other Strategies

There are also other strategies that you can use to help children who are struggling in their learning…

Provide a quiet area for activities like reading, and used books with larger print or bigger spaces between lines.

Provide books on CD or MP3, or provide lecturer notes.

Allow the use of a laptop or tablet in class.

Use multisensory teaching methods.

Teach children to use their logic rather than memorising a specific pathway

Present teaching material in small units rather than in large chunks.

While the strategies may be helpful in helping children cope with their problem, the first and most important step is getting a comprehensive eye tests from behavioural optometrist.

If your child is struggling with these problems, I would recommend glasses, vision therapy, behaviour changes, tutoring or anything else that will help them. Studies show that the earlier intervention occurs, the more effective long term is.

So the message is clear…

If you are concerned that your child might have dyslexia or language based learning disability, visit your behavioural optometrist and get in touch with experts in your area who work with learning difficulties as soon as possible!

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