Learning Disabilities DyslexiaLearning disabilities dyslexia and reading problems of various types are on the increase in our classrooms, and teachers are almost powerless to combat this phenomenon!  There is hope for parents, however, because many of those children diagnosed as dyslexics can be helped as this article will outline…

What is the Difference Between Learning Disabilities Dyslexia and Other Reading Problems?

One of the problems you face when considering learning disabilities dyslexia and other reading disorders is that there is often no stable, universally agreed definition for the conditions.  What one expert calls dyslexia, another calls a reading problem, and when you combine them all they add up to learning disabilities!  So, because so many use the term dyslexia, I find it easier when talking to my patients to divide dyslexia into two types: learning disabilities dyslexia and true or brain dysfunction dyslexia.

Dyslexia in its traditional sense, is a much more specific condition than a simple learning disability, involving some form of brain dysfunction and, unlike the other type (learning disabilities dyslexia), it cannot be easily overcome.

True dyslexia occurs in an inner part of the brain and, although some colored lens therapies seem to help in a few cases, dealing with an actual dysfunction within the brain is a very difficult task indeed!

Should You Just Cope with Learning Disabilities Dyslexia?

Unlike the dysfunction mentioned previously, learning disabilities dyslexia is more a dysfunction of the processing of information coming to the child through the visual system, and as such is not a true case of dyslexia at all.  The brain is fine, but the processing and understanding of visual input is the culprit.  This is not a true dyslexia, but is often diagnosed by educationists as dyslexia.

The really great news is that this type of problem can be aided by easy to apply techniques.  In most of these cases, the visual skills that most children have developed to help them process information and interpret and understand their reading material are underdeveloped, and this is great news for parents because, unlike traditional dyslexia or word blindness, we can easily do something about this!

So, unlike brain dysfunction dyslexia, learning disabilities dyslexia can be positively influenced by anything which can improve or develop the visual skills needed when reading, thereby greatly improving reading ability.

This is not theory, it is fact because I have worked for over 25 years overcoming learning disabilities dyslexia which others have said is something the child must simply learn to cope with!  The fact is that skills like eye tracking, focusing, eye coordination, visual memory, sequencing, laterality coding and the like can be easily improved using special techniques.

Vision Therapy Will Help Learning Disabilities and Dyslexia?

Using Vision Therapy, which is targeted vision exercises and activities (many in the form of games), we can actually see real and measurable improvement in a child’s reading ability.  And this can be done at a fraction of the cost that many other types of learning disabilities treatment cost, from the comfort of your own home!

So check out the best vision therapy online for a cost effective and powerful way of improving your child’s reading ability and learning problems.  If your child has been diagnosed with learning disabilities dyslexia or reading problems, there is a way you can help them today!

learning disabilities resourcesIf you are the parent of a child who is struggling with reading difficulties, you are probably searching for learning disabilities resources all the time, often with limited results.  Why is it that many learning disabilities resources seem to offer little other than the long, tortuous and painstaking frustration of making a child read over and over again.   If reading is the main source of difficulty for a child, one has to ask the question, “Are most learning disabilities resources missing the point?”

Learning Disabilities Resources should be More than Repetition

If you have a child struggling with reading, writing and spelling, simply making them do more of the very task they hate and associate with failure is frustrating and discouraging for both them and you!

It has been said that the definition of insanity is doing the same task over and over expecting a different result, and for many this sums up most learning disabilities resources!  Surely there is a better way to approach things which give some hope and encouragement to our children!

Learning Resources for Disabilities Can Build a Platform for Success

Effective resources must provide a platform for the success of a child struggling to read.  They need to build essential skills which enable reading success, and they need to be interesting, fun and provide a sense of achievement.  They cannot allow the child to fail and struggle, and they need to keep the child motivated to continue.

In short, the best way to provide learning resources that actually work is in the form and games and fun tasks, which somehow build up the skills that children need to succeed.  That is where vision therapy can provide a fantastic alternative to the traditional learning disabilities resources which involve repeated, painful and discouraging tasks.

Learning Disabilities Resources and Vision Therapy

For over 20 years I have been providing learning help using vision therapy, which is a series of targeted games and fun activities which most children love to do and which help to build essential visual skills.  These exercises and therapies train a child’s vision skills to help them learn more effectively and quickly.  These skills, such as focus, eye coordination, sequencing, coding, visual memory, hand eye coordination and eye tracking lay a groundwork to allow reading success, and they do this in a matter of months and with a lot of fun and enjoyment.

This means that we can provide the skills necessary for a child to read effectively, and do so in a fun and enjoyable environment rather than in a screaming match or tearful environment.  Vision therapy can be done at home, wherever you are in the world, and in a few months you could be seeing an amazing transformation in your child’s ability to read, write and spell.

If you then apply the more typical learning resources which involve repetitive reading, you will now find that your child has the basic skills necessary, and will start to improve rapidly rather than slowly.

This may sound crazy, but it is true in most areas of life.  We take our kids to football training to learn football skills, to tennis lessons top learn those skills and guitar lessons to learn guitar playing skills… so why not get the right training for your child’s reading skills.  Vision therapy can produce the right results if you take the time to do it correctly.  It is very often the missing link in learning disabilities resources.

learning disabilityIf you are struggling to help a child with a learning disability then the question of eye tracking when reading may have come up more than once.  Eye tracking refers to the ability of the reader to control their eye movements so that their eyes are pointing to the right place all the time when they are reading, and is frequently reported that a child with a learning disability also shows produced eye tracking ability.

What Causes a Learning Disability?

There are many possible causes of a learning disability, and poor eye tracking is known to be a possible contributory to it.  This is not to say that poor eye tracking or the inability to control eye movements effectively is the only cause of a learning disability, but it certainly can be partially responsible for a number of learning disability symptoms a child may display.

A learning disability has many causes, from brain difficulties and hearing problems right through to the area in which I work as a Behavioral Optometrist, the visual system!  Given that vision is the dominant sense used in the classroom, it follows that dysfunction in the visual system will often be a central cause in a child’s learning disability.

How Does Eye Tracking Contribute to a Learning Disability?

The control of your eye movements is an essential part of reading, so if a child cannot control their eye movements effectively, this can form the basis of a learning disability.

If your child is misreading small words, skipping lines and mixing up words, even though they know the words on the page, then they may have a learning disability that is centered around eye tracking.  If you find that they lose their place easily, and that using a finger under the words significantly helps their reading flow, then eye tracking is almost certain to be a culprit.

Reading with a ruler under the line or a finger under the words can help to relieve some of the symptoms a child with a learning disability may feel, but it does not solve the problem: it only provides a temporary solution to the learning disability!

How Can You Improve a Learning Disability Using Eye Tracking?

The great news is that, if your child has a learning disability in which eye tracking and movement plays a part, the situation is treatable!  I have been successfully reducing this type of learning disability for many years, using a combination of support lenses and, above all, vision therapy training for eye tracking.

Vision therapy consists of a series of exercises that you can do at home, wherever you are in the world, and see positive results in your child.  They are simple yet highly effective in smoothing out eye movements and allowing your child to track correctly when they read, thereby increasing reading speed and accuracy and even enjoyment!  These exercises have been clinically tested and proven to reduce misreading, line skipping and their losing place during reading , and they are a cheap yet potent way of seeing real improvement in your child’s reading ability, flow and concentration.

The right vision therapy targeting the visual skills necessary for reading could be the break through that you are looking for to help your child overcome a learning disability.