<?xml encoding=”UTF-8″>

Vision Problems and Lack of Interest in Reading: A Case Study of an 8-Year-Old Student’s Academic Struggles

Today, I want to talk to you about vision problems that affect learning.I want to tell you a story about Brandon. Brandon, an 8-year-old lad, exhibited a lack of interest in reading and was encountering academic challenges. Brandon is an 8-year-old student who faced several academic challenges during his early education. One of his major concerns was the lack of interest he expressed when it came to reading. Despite repeated efforts by his educators, he demonstrated a reluctance to engage with books or other learning materials. This lack of interest consequently impacted his academic performance, which was below the expected level of his peers. Teachers noted that he struggled with basic literacy skills and often had difficulty comprehending simple texts. This was a source of concern and led them to consider various strategies and interventions that could help him improve. Through careful observation and assessment, it was evident that Brandon required personalized attention and support.

 

Can <a href=Vision Problems Affect Learning?” class=”avatar-img rounded”>

Tailored Teaching Methods and Supportive Resources Improve Literacy Skills for Student with Vision Problems and Learning Disabilities

This involved employing teaching methods that were tailored to his learning style and interests. Educators utilized various tools and resources that could help spark his engagement and motivation, such as incorporating interactive games, visuals, and other multimedia resources into his learning experience. Over time, with the support of his teachers and family, Brandon’s interest in reading began to improve. He demonstrated a willingness to spend more time with books and other materials and gradually began to develop his literacy skills. This improvement continued to translate into other areas of his academic performance, and he was able to confidently overcome the challenges he had previously faced. Through this process, Brandon learned the importance of perseverance, resilience, and support.

 

Convergence Insufficiency: A Hidden Vision Issue Affecting Academic Performance

He discovered that with the right strategies and resources, he could achieve his academic goals and overcome any challenges that came his way. He manifested certain indications, such as rubbing his eyes after reading, being fatigued, and losing his place while reading, often skipping words. To aid his comprehension, he needed to use his finger as a marker to keep track of his progress, ascertaining his position was often difficult. So, Mom brought Brandon to the local optometrist and said, “Can you have his eyes checked?” He read 20/20 (6/6) on the eye chart. The optometrist said he didn’t need any glasses, his vision seemed fine. But Mom knew there was still something going on, so she brought Brandon to our office.I did a visual efficiency evaluation for Brandon and found a couple of things. Even though Brandon saw 20/20 (6/6) on the eye chart, he actually had some issues with his vision system. First of all, Brandon had a condition that we call convergence insufficiency.

 

Brandon’s Reading Difficulty Caused by Eye Turn and Tracking Issues Resolved Through Vision Therapy

This is an inability for Brandon’s eyes to be able to turn inward and to sustain that posture that’s necessary for reading. This was causing him to have a little bit of double vision or blurry vision intermittently when he was trying to focus. Secondly, we found that Brandon had a tracking problem. When Brandon’s eyes were trying to move across the page from left to right as he was reading his texts, I noticed his eyes were bouncing all over the place. Sometimes, they would jump a couple of words. Sometimes, they would jump backward or even jump two lines down. That was causing Brandon difficulty in being able to pay attention to what he was reading. This is causing Brandon to have some difficulty keeping up with what he is reading because he is working so hard to figure out where his eyes should go. Brandon was admitted to our program for vision therapy, where we conducted various exercises to enhance his visual skills.

 

Vision Therapy: The Key to Unlocking Learning Struggles in Students with Undiagnosed Vision Problems

Our primary focus was on improving his tracking skills by enabling his eyes to move accurately and promptly to the intended position, alongside tracking letters while simultaneously improving his timing and speed. The second aspect of our program dealt with developing his muscle system. We aimed to enhance Brandon’s capability to concentrate and sustain his focus, thus preventing any blurriness. Additionally, we worked on increasing his flexibility, enabling his eyes to turn effortlessly without inducing fatigue or headaches.A year after vision therapy, Brandon is now reading at grade level, doing much better in school, and no longer rubbing his eyes. The most important thing is that he actually enjoys reading now. This is just an example of how sometimes, when there is a learning struggle, don’t forget to get your vision checked. Sometimes, an underlying vision problem could be causing a student to struggle in a topic like reading.

 

Unlocking Learning Success: The Importance of Evaluating Vision Problems for Those with Learning Disabilities

If you suspect that you, your child, or a loved one may be struggling with a vision-related learning problem, have them evaluated to see if vision is the missing link that could be the key to their success.

 

Is your child dyslexic? There is a lot of talk these days about dyslexia, probably more than ever before.? An evolution of the definition appears to have taken place, and this has caused confusion for many parents.

The Classic Dyslexic

The classic dyslexic as described in the original literature by people like Drs?Adolph Kussmaul and?Rudolf Berlin (who first used the word dyslexia to describe?someone who, in his terms was “word blind”) implied that the condition was genetic, and thereby incurable.? Examples of such patients were not common, and they displayed an inability to recognise words, as well as the classic symptom of writing words in reverse.

The Modern Dyslexic

The problem is that, as the definition has morphed into pretty much any reading or writing difficulty, the assumption that the condition is incurable has not morphed in the same way.? Dyslexia is now an extremely common diagnosis in some fields, and the problem is that many teachers, and parents, feel that it is a problem that nothing and no one will be able to help in any way.

Several innovations have attempted to help the child dyslexic, the most famous being coloured lenses (Irlen lenses). Less well known is the kind of treatments we offer in our practice, where we use conventional, clear lenses and innovative vision therapy to help dyslexic kids.

How Can We Help?

I’ll e honest, I’m not a fan of labels, especially when they are applied to a child who has enough problems learning!? I see their?usefulness at times, but I would rather prescribe a solution than a label any day.

Vision is the dominant sense in the classroom, and so it makes sense to examine it closely.? Almost every child with a learning problem can see the print, so clearly we are going to have to go beyond the current medical model of so-called 20/20 vision.

Just because a child can see the print, does not mean they can learn effectively!? Chimpanzees can see the print, but they cannot read, so again we are going to have to do better than a traditional eye examination.

Behavioural?optometry?looks at far more than a child’s ability to see, and we perform many complex?tests looking at the child’s eye teaming and focussing, and their ability to decode and process words on a page.

Using specialised?lenses, we find we can often dramatically improve a child’s focusing and concentration when it comes to reading and writing. But hey, concentration is only part of the solution, as any parent knows.

Vision Therapy to the Rescue

I have designed my own vision therapy course which trains the basic visual skills kids need when they learn. Glasses might help, but of the child is far behind we need to try something to catch them up fast.

Using our exclusive vision therapy course, many have seen not instant but sustained improvement in their children, whether they are dyslexic or carrying another label.

Why not have a look at our vision therapy here…

click

Or better still, call this number and make a time to come in for your BULK BILLED eye examination…

5457 3333

The Nightmare of Dyslexia

DyslexiaMany parents struggle with children who have been diagnosed as having dyslexia, and this can open a world of hurt and heartache. Once your child is diagnosed, it seems like you face a continuous uphill battle trying to get help for them that actually works. If you are like most parents, you not interested in the label, you are interested in helping your child improve in the of reading, writing and spelling.

Years ago the term dyslexia was reserved for people who were actually “word blind”, and it represented a minimal brain dysfunction that no one knew much about. However, these days the term dyslexia seems to refer to any child who is struggling to learn, especially those who reverse letters or numbers.

Most of these children struggling with dyslexia do not have brain dysfunction at all, but have developmental dysfunctions which can be helped. As a behavioural optometrist, I have spent the last 30 years helping these types of children, using lenses and vision therapy as tools to help them concentrate and focus longer, and to improve their actual school performance.

Dyslexia is Not about Glasses!

Many people are trying to find the right set of glasses that will cure dyslexia in the kids. The fact is, dyslexia is a developmental disorder and classes will not cure it, though they may help your child concentrate for longer and perform better.

I often use support lenses, which are special glasses designed to help children concentrate and focus on their schoolwork longer. This improves their concentration, and can lead to improvement in performance, but it does not necessarily cause an improvement in their learning.

The Missing Link in Dyslexia

I believe that most dyslexics experience developmental delays in the skills that they need to perform well in the classroom. These skills include eye movements, focus, eye teaming, left-right awareness, visualisation, hand eye coordination and a number of other skills.

While I cannot offer dyslexic children a quick fix, or a magic pair of glasses, coloured or otherwise, what I can offer them is the chance to do vision therapy and trained the visual skills that they need to achieve in school.

This therapy can be done at home and is extremely cost efficient. I do not have a single child doing this therapy that is not improving, either lot or a little.

So if your child has been diagnosed with dyslexia, don’t put up with the nightmare any longer than you have to! A behavioural optometrist could be the answer to your prayers and most often the solution to the nightmare of dyslexia.